S-26® Promise Gold ®

Reformulated to provide balanced nutritional support for preschoolers

S-26® PROMISE GOLD® is a growing-up milk carefully designed to meet the nutritional needs of children 4 and above. Adding S-26® PROMISE GOLD® to a child’s diet provides parents with the peace of mind that their child is consuming a nutritious and healthful beverage that helps fill nutritional gaps.1,2 S-26® PROMISE GOLD® contains more than 40 ingredients, each of which has a recognized function such as helping support growth, development, or health.1


When consumed as directed, S-26® PROMISE GOLD® provides the recommended daily intake for young children for those key nutrients that children may not receive in adequate amounts from their diet.


1.   Committee on Nutrition, American Academy of Pediatrics. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook. Kleinman RE, ed. 6th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2009.
2.  Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes: recommended intakes for individuals. US Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Web site. http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php?
info_center=4&tax_level=3&tax_subject=256&topic_id=1342&level3_id=5140&level4_id=0&level5_id=0
&placement_default=0
. Accessed September 3, 2008.


This growing-up milk serves as a nutritional safety net by providing a healthy complement to the diet at a time when children tend to exhibit their independence at mealtime.

S-26® PROMISE GOLD®, formulated with Biofactors System™ which is a scientific approach to balancing key high-quality nutrients. Its focus is on both the quality and the appropriate quantity of each nutrient to support a child’s mind, visual, development and physical growth at a specific stage of life.


 

S-26® Promise Gold®:

  • Is a nutrient-enriched growing-up milk that delivers 226 kcal per 240 mL serving, providing the energy needs of children 4 years and above
  • Has a heart-healthy fat blend that accounts for 31% of its energy content, which is in line with Malaysia Recommended Nutrient Intake (MRNI) for children to transition to low-fat dairy products
  • Is fortified to contain balanced levels of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids AA and DHA to help support visual and cognitive development
  • Contains whey protein that consists of a high quality protein, alpha-lactalbumin which is readily digested, absorbed, and tolerated
  • Supplies 54% of its energy content from carbohydrates, a proportion in line with Malaysia Recommended Nutrient Intake (MRNI) for energy from macronutrients in children
  • Is sucrose-free to help support healthy eating habits during early childhood
  • Contains a soluble dietary fiber, oligofructose, to help support GI tract health
  • S-26® PROMISE GOLD® provides at least 100% of the US Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for vitamin A, iron, iodine and zinc for less than the recommended intake by older children when fed as directed (3 servings per day). It also meets 100% of the 2008 AAP recommendation for vitamin D intake when fed as directed (3 servings per day)
  • Is fortified with the carotenoid lutein, which acts in the retina as an antioxidant and can help shield developing eyes as a filter against high-energy blue light
  • Contains carotenes, which are natural antioxidants with immune-enhancing effects
  • Contains vitamin D, vitamin K, calcium, and phosphorus, which make an integrative contribution to bone health
  •  Provides at least 100% of the US DRI for iron for young children, when 3 servings (720 mL) per day are consumed, to help prevent iron deficiency, which may lead to adverse effects on physical and mind development
  •  Provides at least 48–72% of the US DRI for young children for most nutrients when consumed as directed, thereby supplying an ideal complement to the diet and serving as a nutritional safety net during a period of unpredictable eating habits

Available in these sizes: 600g, 1.2kg and 1.8kg (box)/ 900g (can)

Ingredients

Please refer to Nutritional panel on the product

 

Nutritional Information

 

References:
1. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes: recommended intakes for individuals. US Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Web site. http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php?
info_center=4&tax_level=3&tax_subject=256&topic_id=1342&level3_id=5140&level4_id=0&level5_id=0
&placement_default=0
. Accessed September 3, 2008. 2. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2005. 3. Prentice AM. Macronutrients as sources of food energy. Public Health Nutr. 2005;8(7A):932-939. doi:10.1079/PHN2005779. 4. Marshall K. Therapeutic applications of whey protein. Altern Med Rev. 2004;9(2):136-156. 5. Pennington JAT, Douglass JS. Bowes & Church’s Food Values of Portions Commonly Used. 18th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2005.
6. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21, 2008. Milk, reduced fat, fluid, 2% milkfat, with added vitamin A. NDB No. 01079. http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/. Accessed August 26, 2009. 7. Neuringer M. Infant vision and retinal function in studies of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: methods, results, and implications. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(suppl):256S-267S.  8. Neuringer M, Jeffrey BG. Visual development: neural basis and new assessment methods. J Pediatr. 2003;143:S87-S95.  9. Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Carbohydrates in Human Nutrition. Carbohydrates in Human Nutrition. Rome, Italy: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 1998. FAO Food and Nutrition Papers 66. http://www.fao.org/docrep/W8079E/W8079E00.htm. 10. Niness KR. Inulin and oligofructose: what are they? J Nutr. 1999;129:1402S-1406S. 11. Schneeman BO. Fiber, inulin and oligofructose: similarities and differences. J Nutr. 1999;129:1424S-1427S. 12. Wagner CL, Greer FR; and Section on Breastfeeding and Committee on Nutrition. Prevention of rickets and vitamin D deficiency in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2008;122(5):1142-1152. doi:10.1542/peds.2008-1862.
13. Krinsky NI. Effects of carotenoids in cellular and animal systems. Am J Clin Nutr. 1991;53(1):238S-246S. 14. Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Human Vitamin and Mineral Requirements. Dietary antioxidants. In: Vitamin and Mineral Requirements in Human Nutrition. 2nd ed. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 2004:145-163.
15.. Krinsky NI. The evidence for the role of carotenes in preventive health. Clin Nutr. 1988;7(3):107-112.
16. Alves-Rodrigues A, Shao A. The science behind lutein. Toxicol Lett. 2004;150:57-83.  doi:10.1016/j.toxlet.2003.10.031. 17. Landrum JT, Bone RA, Joa H, Kilburn MD, Moore LL, Sprague KE. A one year study of the macular pigment: the effect of 140 days of a lutein supplement. Exp Eye Res. 1997;65:57-62.  18.. Rapp LM, Maple SS, Choi JH. Lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations in rod outer segment membranes from perifoveal and peripheral human retina. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2000;41(5):1200-1209.  19. Schalch W, Dayhaw-Barker P, Barker FM II. The carotenoids of the human retina. In: Taylor A, ed. Nutritional and Environmental Influences on the Eye. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1999:215-250 = internal version 1-36 .  20. Hammond BR Jr, Wooten BR, Curran-Celentano J. Carotenoids in the retina and lens: possible acute and chronic effects on human visual performance. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2001;385(1):41-46. doi:10.1006/abbi.2000.2184.

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